Re: FMO3

Dr Dolphin was part of the team who first demonstrated that mutations in the FMO3 gene are the cause of the inherited (primary form) of TMAU.

Moderator: admin

Re: FMO3

Postby kittycat » Thu Jul 07, 2011 11:01 am

Re: New member & FMO3 discoverer
by FADworker » Sun Jul 03, 2011 7:25 pm

kittycat wrote:
Hello Mr Dolphin, yes, thank you very much for giving your time to answer our questions.
I don't know if this question is in your remit, but even a speculation would be interesting...Is it possible to manufacture the FMO3 enzyme, and would it help Tmau, primary or aquired? Regards, kittycatx

Hi kittycat,

The enzyme can indeed be 'manufactured' - its a protein and most proteins can be made in the lab' using a 'host' animal (or plant) to make it for us. This host is usually a lab' strain of E. coli or we can use yeast or cultures of cells. However, the FMO3 enzyme would need to be introduced into the liver - which is the major site in the body for the oxidation of TMA - and this would not be possible for a protein. That said the alternative would be to introduce a 'normal' copy of the FMO3 gene into a patient's liver and then the gene would direct the liver cells to produce FMO3 enzyme in the correct location. This is 'gene therapy' and, although its been around for 30 years or more, its had really very little success for any inherited disease. In theory gene therapy would help in TMAU - in practice the technological hurdles that still have to be overcome for any form of gene therapy are still pretty formidable.FADworker

Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2011 11:04 am
kittycat
 
Posts: 467
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:19 pm

Re: FMO3

Postby kittycat » Thu Jul 07, 2011 11:11 am

And yet gene therapy is always lauded as the 'cure all' for nearly every disease..Is it the fevered imagination of the media, or do you think so much research is being done, that it will be in general use one day? Do you know of any research that will benefit Tmau sufferers, however indirect. And is anyone remotely interested in further research of the FMO3 enzyme? Thanks again, kittyx
kittycat
 
Posts: 467
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:19 pm

Re: FMO3

Postby FADworker » Wed Jul 13, 2011 9:23 pm

kittycat wrote:And yet gene therapy is always lauded as the 'cure all' for nearly every disease..Is it the fevered imagination of the media, or do you think so much research is being done, that it will be in general use one day? Do you know of any research that will benefit Tmau sufferers, however indirect. And is anyone remotely interested in further research of the FMO3 enzyme? Thanks again, kittyx


You're right about gene therapy (GT) being much hyped but, as in many things, its natural for people's enthusiasm to get ahead of them. When GT was first described as the potential 'magic bullet' for inherited diseases people hadn't appreciated the difficulties that would be accounted in actualy getting the working gene into the cells of the organ in which the gene needed to work. For FMO3 GT a functional, so-called therapeutic gene, would need to be delivered to the cells of the liver - this is no easy task and no acceptable and effective method has really yet been found. That said, research continues into 'gene delivery' and a safe, effective method may yet be found.

As for TMAU research in general I think you should be hopeful - research is often slow in its progress but I think there are people intetested in TMAU and who are doing what they can.
FADworker
 
Posts: 37
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2011 10:04 am

Re: FMO3

Postby kittycat » Sat Jul 16, 2011 10:14 pm

Many thanks Dr Dolphin :D ...Again, apologies if I'm asking the wrong questions but here goes...There's at least one scientist pioneering faecal transplants, mainly for patients afflicted by E coli. There's some thought that it may also help Parkinson's patients. Is it something you have heard, of being of future interest on a broader scale? Also will stem cell research ever benefit Tmau 1 or 2?.... Best regards, kitty
kittycat
 
Posts: 467
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:19 pm

Re: FMO3

Postby FADworker » Sun Jul 17, 2011 9:17 pm

kittycat wrote:Many thanks Dr Dolphin :D ...Again, apologies if I'm asking the wrong questions but here goes...There's at least one scientist pioneering faecal transplants, mainly for patients afflicted by E coli. There's some thought that it may also help Parkinson's patients. Is it something you have heard, of being of future interest on a broader scale? Also will stem cell research ever benefit Tmau 1 or 2?.... Best regards, kitty


Hi kittycat

"Faecal transplants" - possibly, but we'd need to know far more about the major types of bacteria present in the gastrointestinal tracts of patients with TMAU and which types are responsible for the majority of TMA production.
FADworker
 
Posts: 37
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2011 10:04 am

Re: FMO3

Postby kittycat » Mon Jul 18, 2011 9:49 pm

Would identifying the responsible bacteria be difficult, and can you say how the bacteria samples would be obtained? In other words, would it hurt? :cry: or simple stool samples? Thank-you, kittyx
kittycat
 
Posts: 467
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:19 pm

Re: FMO3

Postby FADworker » Sat Jul 23, 2011 1:01 pm

kittycat wrote:Would identifying the responsible bacteria be difficult, and can you say how the bacteria samples would be obtained? In other words, would it hurt? :cry: or simple stool samples? Thank-you, kittyx


Collect stool sample in container, store in freezer until analysis. Wouldn't hurt only a bit yukky! In terms of identifying what's in there it's only been possible to do this in the last 5-10 years as techniques to sequence the order of the 4 letters, A,T,C,G of DNA have improved dramatically in terms of speed & cost. With a stool sample all the DNA contained in it would be extracted and then everything is sequenced in one go. Then you have to use some powerful computers and clever software to match the thousands of DNA sequences to known bacterial species to give a profile in that sample. Not perfect but works pretty well.
FADworker
 
Posts: 37
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2011 10:04 am

Re: FMO3

Postby kittycat » Wed Jul 27, 2011 7:03 pm

Thanks again :D Could you say how many samples would be considered a good 'range'... Who would commission/ok such a project....Who owns the equipment and the labs.......And about how long would it take to gather the info, and finally, could you hazard a 'ball park figure' on the cost? Sorry I know you didn't offer your services as a quantity surveyor/project manager, I tried to resist these questions but kittycat made me write them.......
kittycat
 
Posts: 467
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:19 pm

Re: FMO3

Postby FADworker » Thu Jul 28, 2011 7:19 pm

kittycat wrote:Thanks again :D Could you say how many samples would be considered a good 'range'... Who would commission/ok such a project....Who owns the equipment and the labs.......And about how long would it take to gather the info, and finally, could you hazard a 'ball park figure' on the cost? Sorry I know you didn't offer your services as a quantity surveyor/project manager, I tried to resist these questions but kittycat made me write them.......


This sort of study would be quite involved, might take 2-3 years and would need to be funded by a major research council so we're talking approx. £250,000. It would also depend upon recruiting sufficient numbers of patients and 'matched' controls.
FADworker
 
Posts: 37
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2011 10:04 am

Re: FMO3

Postby Ms Bananas » Fri Jul 29, 2011 2:05 pm

Hello and very sorry to butt in on Kittycat's thread, but I thought it might be confusing if I started another thread about this. I don't really have a question here, I'm just sharing info in case it helps.

I haven't been tested for Tmau yet so I don't know if I'd test positive or not, but I have had all the symptoms for about 20 years. I had some sort of a gut bacterial analysis done about three years ago by Genova Diagnostics, the test was called CDSA 2.0. At the time I hadn't tried the Tmau diet yet because I didn't know this illness existed, I was eating 'normally'. My diagnosis was dysbiosis. Here is what they found, the stool was collected on three consecutive days, stored in a freezer and then flown to the lab:

Beneficial bacteria:

Lactobacillus species 3+ (should be 2+ or greater)
Escherichia coli 3+ (should be 2+ or greater)
Bifidobacterium 2+ (should be 4+ or greater)

Additional bacteria, non-pathogens:

alpha haemolytic Streptococcus 4+
gamma haemolytic Streptococcus 3+
Pantoea species 4+

Additional bateria, potential pathogen:

Klebsiella pneumoniae 4+ (out of range)

Mycology, non-pathogen:

Geotrichum species 1+
Ms Bananas
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 12:15 pm

Next

Return to Questions for Dr Dolphin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest